St Luke's Women Center moves to new building

CPMC's new Mission Bernal Campus has bigger, more comfortable, and safer rooms for birth

 Labor and delivery room at the new Mission Bernal Campus - check out the views!

Labor and delivery room at the new Mission Bernal Campus - check out the views!

I’ll focus on the nuts and bolts of the new labor and delivery unit, which I toured along with a group of doulas and midwives before it opened.

Hannah Epstein, the lead midwife for the St Luke's Women Center, organized and led the tour. She says the new building won’t change the care - it’s just moving to a lovelier environment. In addition to looking nicer for patients, she emphasizes that the majority of the improvements are meant to streamline operations for the providers. Instead of wires literally underfoot in the operating and delivery rooms, cords run from the ceiling and the medical equipment is organized for a smoother workflow.

It’s also substantially more secure, with locking doors that patients and families will have to get buzzed into. But Hannah says that if your baby is coming very fast it’s okay to go straight through the doors and trigger the alarm - that will alert the staff to attend to you right away!

The new unit is twice of the size of the old, with 6 labor and delivery rooms, 16 postpartum rooms, and 2 operating rooms. There is also a 4 bed nursery. All of the birth rooms have large tubs for laboring in (not birthing, I’m assuming) and nitrous oxide for pain relief. They also have sleeper sofas which are slightly bigger and more comfy than the old. All the rooms had big windows and great views.

 The tubs are more roomy than most hospital tubs although they aren’t meant for birthing in

The tubs are more roomy than most hospital tubs although they aren’t meant for birthing in

There are 4 triage rooms, which will do double duty as antepartum testing rooms until eventually that function is moved to the Hartzell building. They will also be called on as needed for early inductions.

The main entrance to the building on Cesar Chavez will be locked after 7pm, and everyone in labor, regardless of the time, is encouraged to use the ER entrance on 27th St off Guerrero. There will be a pull in spot on the street where you can leave your car, drop your keys with security and go up to Labor and Delivery on the 7th floor. Once the laboring person is settled, someone can come down and move the car into the Duncan garage, which also have two dedicated OB spots closer to the entrance.

The heightened security of the new unit comes with a few downsides - only nurses have access to the kitchen for example (where there is a fridge for patient food). Also, if you want to stair-walk in labor, there is no way to get back into the unit after you’ve been badged onto the stairs, so the only option is to walk all the way down to the first floor and take the elevator back up.

The new cafeteria will be open from 6:30am - 6:30pm with the same food but in a nicer space. Eventually, the current hospital building will be razed to make way for outdoor garden space and there will be a conference room available to rent. Other amenities include a meditation room open 24/7, a family waiting room and play area outside of the locked unit, and a lactation and breastfeeding room.

 This is a typical postpartum room - same views, much smaller. The loveseat pulls out to a bed.

This is a typical postpartum room - same views, much smaller. The loveseat pulls out to a bed.

Although Hannah hopes that the care won’t change, Sutter does want the new unit to increase their volume to 120-150 births per month. There will still be one midwife and one doctor on duty around the clock, just like now. Currently St Luke’s only has one full time lactation consultant, which results in spotty coverage, although Hannah says that she would like to hire more as the volume increases.

There is also the possibility that other medical practices will have privileges at the hospital, and that there could be some shared call in the future. That means that St Luke’s Women’s Center patients could potentially end up with a doctor from another practice managing their birth.

My colleague Firen Jones already wrote a great blog post on the care and policies at the old unit. Ultimately, those factors are more important than the physical building - but the new space is an upgrade that will definitely feel nicer and positively impact family's birth experience.